WELCOME TO AMLOU | EST. 2014 | DENMARK - MOROCCO

Behind Amlou.dk

Ayoob is the entrepreneur behind Amlou, and since childhood he has been accustomed to setting up a new environment and taking the best of the places where he has been and mixe it. And that is the spirit of Amlou. Ayoob wants to present beautiful original textiles that contain deeper history, but at the same time is also comfortable and multi-functional. The textiles can be composed with one's favorite furniture, which in this way can create a unique home with soul and history.

Amlous collaborators are organized in a cooperative in Atlas, Morocco, and Ayoob has a family relationship with one of the women who acts as a spokaswoman and facilitator. The women are from an area characterised by Amazigh, and it is a population that is traced back to 1500 f.Kr. Amazigh The women have been nourished by needlework since the dawn of time, and their methods have thus been passed on from mothers to daughters.

Ayoob Henry John Farah is a bit of a story in itself. Born in Las Palmas, he is the son of a Moroccan mother and a Palestinian father. Ayoob has grocery blood in the veins and was already taken to the port to inspect fish and send steed containers to Asia and Europe. Ayoob still remembers the nice fish wives at the port of Agadir who would hug and served freshly caught fish for breakfast.

Long before it was thought of Ayoob, the action played out a completely different place-Ayoobs's father, Henry John, who is a recognized businessman in the Middle East began his voyage at sea. The family was forced to flee Palestine, first took Ayoobs's grandfather, John, to go to Gran Canaria, followed by his children. Ayoobs's father, as you know, took sea. He sailed for many years and exploited his father's business genes-he came around Greece, where his mother was originally from before she, as a nurse, went to Palestine to provide relief. After the father of Ayoobs was reunited with his family in Gran Canaria, he went to the mainland, as he could see from the coast-he dreamed of starting up his own fishing industry. He tore the tent poles up again and managed directly from Las Palmas to Agadir. Fate would be that Ayoobs's mother was the receptionist at the hotel where he checked in. Here came seven narrow and seven obese years, when the family, through the office of Henry John, lived in Spain, Morocco and Jordan. Like his father, Ayoob left his home in the early teenage years to create his own, and he continued his nomadic life just like in childhood. Today, Ayoob has changed course and the compass needle is plugged north, which is why the North African, Middle Eastern and South Africa have been replaced by a small North Jutland fishing village.